Recent News

rss

News and media from GSA


Steampunk Exhibit reviewed by Maine Antique Digest
Steampunk Exhibit reviewed by Maine Antique Digest

Steampunk. Never heard of it? Trust me. You'll encounter the term more often from now on. Briefly and somewhat simplistically, steampunkers play with the illusion that time periods can coexist. They imagine what things might have looked like if our technology had been available to the Victorians, and then they create those things. Those who make steampunk objects primarily modify Victorian antiques, but they also use antiques from other eras, recycled items, salvage, and plain old junk. And while often their creations qualify as art, they commonly also have a specific, practical purpose. There are rideable steampunk bicycles, playable steampunk guitars, steampunk clocks that tell time, and steampunk houses that people live in. Both an aesthetic and an interior-design solution, steampunk is also, for some, a philosophy of life.


Style Music TV visited me at the TAAS show

Here is an interview I did with Style Music TV at The American Antique Show last year.  The style of the interview is pretty laid-back, but the content that I get a chance to convey is fun.  It also offers a great chance to see my booth and what goes on at the show.  The clip is one piece, watch the beginning to see Martha Stewart, but my portion is from  3:45-7:10


Joshua Wilder Mirror Clock: An Outtake from Harbor & Home
Joshua Wilder Mirror Clock: An Outtake from Harbor & Home

A 28" tall Federal mirror clock by Joshua Wilder of Hingham, Massachusetts, with eight-day time-and-passing-strike (i.e., just one bong on the hour), sold in the room for $35,550 (est. $25,000/35,000) to collector Joe Arvay. The underbidder on the phone was dealer Gary R. Sullivan of Sharon, Massachusetts.

While researching the award-winning Harbor & Home: Furniture of Southeastern Massachusetts, 1710-1850, with Brock Jobe and Jack O'Brien, Sullivan located a total of five mirror clocks made by Wilder, including the present one, which sold at Skinner on June 8, 1997, for $25,300. Robert Cheney recalls that he tried to buy it at that sale but was unsuccessful. A couple of years later, Cheney said he bought it at Christie's for roughly the same price. It went on from there to be owned by others.ne bong on the hour), sold in the room for $35,550 (est. $25,000/35,000) to collector Joe Arvay. The underbidder on the phone was dealer Gary R. Sullivan of Sharon, Massachusetts.